About

Mission Statement:  Asthma History is a living history of asthma, allergies, inhalers, and respiratory therapy.  It's essentially a history of difficult breathing.

Asthma History:  Asthma-like symptoms were first described as far back as ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, with the term asthma being first used by ancient Greek scribes to describe short, gasping breaths.  Its Greek form was ἅσθμα. Around 800 B.C. Homer mentioned asthma in his epic poem The Iliad.  He used it to refer to dyspnea (air hunger) from exertion and from mortal battle wounds. Four hundred years later the term was defined for the medical community by Hippocrates.  The term was then used for most of history as a rubric term covering any medical condition causing dyspnea.  Slowly, as time progressed, the term was further defined by physicians, with diseases such as cardiac asthma, kidney asthma, bronchitis, and catarrh (allergies or the common cold) branching off to become disease entities of their own. In this way, all respiratory ailments owe their roots to asthma.

Contact information:  You can contact me by using the Contactr link in the right hand column of this and all my blogs.

Reference information:  References are listed with links to sources on every article published on this website. They may be used to further advance any attempt to recreate history.

Disclaimer: Keep in mind this is a blog written, edited, and published by the same person. Research is conducted, and blogposts written, in the few free hours that come available in an otherwise busy life as a husband, dad, respiratory therapist, columnist, and blogger.  This blog has been put together in good faith to share what I have learned about our history.  

1 comment:

  1. Hi Hohn,

    Couldn't figure out how to drop you an email, so I am commenting in order to connect. I am curator of the Dittrick Museum of Medical History (http://artsci.case.edu/Dittrick/) in Cleveland, and we are doing an exhibit for the 50th anniversary of the AARC in April. Your blog has been a great help, and as I'm not an asthma expert, you could be of some help along the way. I may be reached at jme3@case.edu. The Dittrick, by the way, has the most extensive stethoscope collections in the U.S. drop me a line and I will share some picw of the display.

    Regards, Jim

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